Stockholm stories

At the end of May we ventured a little further from home, boarding a plane to Sweden. Well actually, we boarded a plane for a ridiculous 35 minute flight to Zurich where we had to change to fly to Stockholm!_MG_5530

Stockholm was a fantastic experience although it was cold. Really cold. We arrived to 10 degrees and chilly winds, which were soon accompanied by ice cold rain.

Stockholm is an archipelago of 14 islands, with a superb public transport system (trams, subway and ferries) and a number
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Our apartment was in the hipster Sodermalm area which was brimming with cool. Pop up bars, no-reservation cafes, food trucks and skateboard parks were frequented by young people in skinny jeans and over sized sunglasses.

To the north of Sodermalm is the central city and Gamla Stan (the old town). We were actually in Stockholm for me to run the marathon, and on Saturday I joined over 20,000 other runners in pounding the pavements through the centre of Stockholm, past many of the famous attractions such as the Royal Palace.

McdsAfter finishing my first marathon freezing cold, soaking wet and deliriously happy, we slowly made our way through town. Although I was exhausted, the multi story shopping malls and modern glam of the inner city did not escape me. Our first mission – despite the vast traditional, international, modern, fusion and downright delicious offerings in Stockholm – was to McDonalds. Scandinavia is the only place in the world where you can get gluten free burgers at Mcdonalds, and I did not just have one.

With as little self-powered movement as possible, we shuffled across the road that evening to catch a movie on the big screen – the first in probably over a year. In Sweden, television and movies are not dubbed (although they have Swedish subtitles), so we could enjoy some English media. English is widely spoken in Sweden, and we never had a problem communicating. As we noticed the night before, the sun didn’t set until after midnight, and rose again at about 3am. It is bizarre waking up in the small hours of the morning to bright daylight!

_MG_5412On Sunday it was sightseeing time! First stop via a ferry ride was Skansen, an open air museum with installations from various regions of Sweden throughout the ages. We wandered through villages of wooden houses from the 1700s, bought coffee from 19th century shops selling grains and cotton and enjoyed a view of Stockholm from the botanical gardens. In addition, Skansen has a zoo with Icelandic animals. The moose were probably the most impressive, with their graceful movements, impressive height and colossal antlers.

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Skansen is on what is called the “museum island” of Djurgarden, although there are museums all over the archipelago. After crepes for lunch, we headed to Vasa – our favourite museum of the trip. Within this museum is housed the huge wooden Vasa warship, which sunk in the Stockholm harbour in 1628 and was only salvaged in 1961. Aside from the massive, largely intact viking ship in the middle of a building, the 4 stories of educational journey visitors are taken on was amazing. We read about the building of the ship, the faults which caused it to sink, the lifestyles of the locals at the time, where the supplies for such ships came from and all about life on board for the sailors. _MG_5598We learned about finding the ship after hundreds of years, and the dangerous salvage mission. It was fascinating to learn about how experts needed to dig tunnels on the ocean floor and carefully float the ship. There were scale models as well as entire rooms set up as various areas of the ship, so that visitors could experience what it would have been like inside. Explanations not only of the decorative features of the ship but also of how conclusions about the colours of paint used were drawn and of other artwork of the time, really helped to add context. An entire floor was dedicated to the science of preservation and we learned about the difficulties in drying and preserving the various materials on board. It took over 15 years for the initial drying period, during which time 1.5 times its weight in water was removed. The drying process continues today, and over the last 5 decades advances in technology have seen more and more sophisticated preservation techniques being applied to the ship. The technical section finished with a delightful exhibition of skeletons and human remains found on board, along with forensic explanations about the identity of the people.

MtballsWe emerged from the specially temperature and light controlled environment of the vasa museum some hours later, and made our way back to the main island. Here we visited a restaurant named Unter Kastanjen for some traditional Swedish fare. Everything on the menu was available gluten free, so I even enjoyed some garlic bread along with my Swedish meatballs. Since our table was earmarked as gluten free, James’ burger also came on gf bread therefore I was able to eat from his plate much to his annoyance and my delight!

Whilst wandering the streets, I will admit that there were a few moments where I simply had to sit on the side walk, since my legs, post-marathon, refused to walk another step. Plenty of cafe stops and rests saw me battling through, and after dinner we still managed to cram in Fotografika – the photography museum. Here were installations from a variety of photographers, with an interestingly diverse range of styles.

_MG_5664After a deep and dreamless sleep, our last day in Stockholm arrived far too soon. Our first mission was to visit the library; well worth a bit of a trek out of the main city. This architectural masterpiece, designed by Gunnar Asplund has a rotunda as its centre, meaning that when one stands in the middle of the room they are surrounded by circular walls of towering bookshelves. I could have stayed there all day._MG_5662

_MG_5691The amusement park in Stockholm was also included in our 3 day pass, so we took advantage of a couple of sunny hours to ride the rollercoasters and play arcade games.

Later that afternoon saw us back in the old town, where unfortunately the Royal Palace was closed but the Nobel Peace Prize museum offered some interesting insight into Nobel, the prize and previous winners.

After checking out the cute boutiques,_MG_5676 stopping for “Fika”, the Swedish tradition of coffee and cake at 3pm (gluten free cake? No problem!) and admiring the water one last time, it was time to head to the airport.

Sweden has a different feel to Central Europe, and seems to be a mixture of Old-World Europe and modern Anglophone/American culture, with its own special touch of eccentric Scandinavian custom. Our action packed 4 days in Stockholm were exciting, refreshing, inspiring and wonderful. It was just a little bit of a relief however, to leave the Krone behind and return to Euros!

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Extravagance, elegance and experience! From United Arab Emirates to France in March

This month, James travelled overseas alone to Abu Dhabi, where he had the perfect holiday. After months of daily _MG_4275 German courses, homework and study being fitted in around his other part time job, not to mention the short days and icy temperatures, he was well overdue for a break and what a place to spend it. James’ parents Michael and Jennene were in Abu Dhabi for a conference, and since it is only a 7 hour flight direct from Stuttgart (like flying Auckland to Perth), it was an opportunity not to be missed for James to catch up with his parents after nearly a year of being away from home._MG_4354

After the ancient cities of Europe, Abu Dhabi was like another world, one where the line between fantasy and reality is blurred and the level of opulence is realms beyond any other country we had ever visited. James was awestruck from the minute he landed, with the scale of the buildings, the brightness of the lights, the modernness of the interiors and the sheer luxury which was everywhere. The streets could have literally been lined with gold and noone would have blinked an eye.

All of this luxury comes at a price however – which James learnt on the first night after ordering a single glass of whiskey…and receiving a bill for 75 euros! The hotel where the Brosnahans were staying was directly over the famous Formula One track, and they breakfasted whilst watching Ferrari’s zoom around the track below them. James and his mum visited Ferrari world, riding the roller coaster and ogling the cars.

A highlight of the trip was a visit to the Sheikh Zayed mosque. The mosque itself covers an area of 12 square hectares, and was intended to be a symbol of unity, to represent_MG_4270 the cultural diversity in the UAE and the world. Materials and pieces of art from many different countries are included in the _MG_4197design, notabu dhabi james least the huge chandeliers made from Swarovski crystal, imported from Germany. The carpet in the main prayer hall is over 5,500 m squared and is one single piece woven from wool sourced partly from New Zealand.

Marble and precious stones abound inside the mosque, with inlays of pearl and gold everywhere. In order to enter the mosque tourists must respect the religious and cultural beliefs of the local community, therefore James was required to don a full length garment to hide his bare legs.

A day trip saw the family plus some friends from the conference, including a good friend Justin from New Zealand, visit nearby Dubai. Here the Mall of Dubai held hours worth of entertainment, with an aquarium (complete with sharks) in its midst. Other sights included the Gold markets, spice markets and a boat tour along the Dubai “creek”, as well as a view of the world’s tallest building towering above the other skyscrapers.

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At first distracted by the shining attractions, James later did notice that this sparkling oasis is still in the middle of a desert. We wonder what life would be like when the majority of daily life is conducted indoors, and main attractions include shopping (especially important since a lot of emphasis does seem to be placed on wealth and status in these cities). On the road between Abu Dhabi and Dubai, the unspoken seedier side of the UAE was evident, with poverty stricken immigrants lining the streets, on their way to 15 hour work days and certainly nowhere near the clean, beautiful streets of the main cities. _MG_4425_MG_4433

In general, 5 days in the sun and heat, relaxing by the pool and partaking in the extravagant lifestyle that is life in the UAE, were a complete delight for James. He returned home raving about Abu Dhabi and we can’t wait to go together one day! Seeing his parents after so long was also fantastic and he enjoyed every minute of his holiday.

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Although Abu Dhabi certainly counted as a country for our goal of visiting a different land each month…. I wasn’t there so we needed to get me across a border as well! In the last weekend of March we headed to Strassbourg in France. From Stuttgart, Strassbourg can be reached in just over an hour with the TGV however this convenience does not come cheap. We instead took advantage of the Baden Wurttemberg ticket which allows us both to travel on all commuter transport in the state for 24 hours, for just 28 euros. We set off from Tubingen at 7am and 3 hours later crossed the border into France (our ticket got us as far as Kehl, from where it is just 10 minutes to Strassbourg). It was a stunning sunny day, perfect for exploring the pretty Alsace town. Even the main train station was distinctly more French than German, however we were relieved to find that German and English are spoken widely. I have never met such friendly French people as I did in Strassbourg and was grateful for the hospitality of the cafe owners, shopkeepers and tourism operators .

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After strolling through the old town and stopping off at the numerous chocolate shops, we stopped at a cafe, where we enjoyed a coffee and a spot of people watching in the sunshine. Having stimulated our appetites we proceeded directly to lunch – at a creperie of course! Being able to enjoy both a savoury and a sweet crepe was as always a treat for me since the French make their ‘Galettes’ with gluten free buckwheat flour. Afterwards we made our way to the Cathedral… but not before picking up some macarons from a very sweet and elegant patisserie.

The Strassbourg Cathedral is a magnificent site, and was the world’s tallest building until 1874. Its gothic architecture is so intricate, and thousands of carved figures adorn its sandstone outer walls. Inside the wonderment continues, with high curved ceilings, stained glass windows and an astronomical clock.

In complete contrast to this building from the middle ages is Strassbourg’s more modern claim to fame – the headquarters of the European Union and Parliament.

We took the quintessential covered boat tour, which cruised along Strassbourg’s canals and took us past these sights. The Parliament building holds an amphitheater with 750 seats, and is surrounded by gardens which create a wall of green. The court of human rights of the EU is also here, and is a symbol of conciliation and peace. We floated past the Rhine Palace, Fisherman’s Quay and half timbered houses – which used to be like furniture; non-permanent fixtures to be moved around at will. Many of the buildings along the canals have a rich history, having over the years housed hospitals, then convents, then schools, then prisons. The four canals along which we rode are on two levels, and we had to go through Locks where 360,000 litres of water flows in to raise the water level 1.8 metres, allowing boats to access the next level of canals. We passed under many covered bridges where gunners took their positions during battles throughout time – the bridges were covered not to protect the gunners from the elements however, rather the gunpowder!_MG_4591 _MG_4594 _MG_4597

The waterways have many stories associated with them and form part of Strassbourg’s identity. One such example is that the washing of the rich was done upstream of the poor, but if something from the rich escaped the washerwomen and floated downstream, they had to pay the poorer women to get it back! The old tanneries next to the water which are now closed in, used to have open roofs to dry the skins, and criminals were tortured in cages hung from the bridges around the city. The contrast of medieval history, centuries old buildings and churches (with tombs dating back to 1180) with the modern concept of the European Parliament mean that Strassbourg has an interesting and ecclectic collection of sites. Combined with its German influences and French culture, mixture of locals and tourists and of course the crepes and macarons, this gem in the Alsace is certainly a place we will visit again.

Making the most of our travel ticket, we crossed the border again and headed slightly south back into the Black Forest, to stay the night in Freiburg. We didn’t check out too many sights in this attractive student town, but I ran in my first European race which was a real experience! I have never run in an event with so many participants, where for the first few kilometers it was impossible to find elbow room and where I was never wanting for company.

_MG_4626_MG_4661This March update has been somewhat delayed… thanks to the adventure that has been moving house! That story deserves a blog post in itself, but suffice to say we have been kept extremely busy and are looking forward to our next mini-break overseas.