Florence and the Cinque Terre

_MG_2858As a last stop on this segment of our trip, and the last few days of our continuous travel segment, we flew into Florence, Italy.

It is hard not to fall in love with Italy, and Florence was no exception. From the moment we arrived dirty and tired at one in the morning, the beauty and relaxed feel of the city was a relief from the heat and chaos of Greece. Although the Italians are not known for their punctuality (argh!) one can only “go with the flow” and take it as part of the experience._MG_2991

Aside from cobbled streets, red brick buildings, scooters and crawling vines the biggest feature of Florence (Firenze) is its Duomo. In the centre of town is the Santa Maria del Fiore, the largest dome in the world that is built from brick and mortar. The cathedral itself is an ornate work of art, and its dome is no exception.

Many other renaissance buildings and churches are nestled into the historic center, and of course the main attraction for many people is the art. The original statue of David by Michealangelo, a room with walls made from semi-precious stones and paintings which are hundreds of years old are just some of the priceless treasures one can see here. Not having time to truly enjoy a museum visit, we wandered the streets instead, taking a walk over the Ponte Vecchio (an ancient bridge line with gold merchants) and up the hill to the Piazzale Michaelangelo. We were rewarded with a stunning view of the city! _MG_2842

When in Italy of course wine, pizza, pasta and gelato must be enjoyed! The Italians didn’t fail to deliver on the gluten free front as usual, and its probably good for our waistlines that we didn’t stay for more than a couple of days…

On our second day, we took part in a magical “alternative” tour of the Cinque Terre with our friend Sarah from New Zealand. Starting early, we boarded a bus for an entertaining two hour drive north, on which our young and enthusiastic guides regaled us with tales of their own lives as well as the history of the region. We drove past the famous Pisa, and past cultivated gardens and fields – a reminder of the skills that the Romans brought when they invaded and took over most of Italy. We cruised past Lucca, the town with city walls so deep people can ride bikes along them and they used to be roads! As we moved North of Tuscany into the Liguria region, we heard about Byron and Shelley who loved to spend time here. drinking, boating and swimming in what is now called “Poet’s Gulf”.

The Cinque Terre, a World Heritage site consists of 5 fishing villages set into the cliffs overlooking the Italian Riviera. The roads are narrow and they aren’t accessible by bus. Traditionally the trek between the villages had to be made by the dirt tracks set high on the cliff, and it was along this unadultered trail we embarked between the second and third villages, Corniglia and Vernassa. There were no handrails, benches or groomed trails and we certainly felt intrepid as we carefully walked along the narrow uneven dirt trail which passed sheer cliffsides, rows and rows of grapes, small houses and twisted at times through the forest. Our guides pointed out the chestnut trees – a lifesaver for people living (and hiding) here during the war, when no supplies were able to be brought in.

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At the third village the sun was already beating down as we sat on a shady terrace to enjoy a lunch of local delicacies. _MG_2983Anchovies are the pride of the region and we had them prepared two different ways as well as an assortment of other seafoods, and delicious risotto. Moving on we caught a short train to the next village, Monterrosso, where we enjoyed some time to wander and take a quick dip.

After waiting for 40 minutes for our delayed train (typical!) we arrived at the fourth village, Levanto. Here we had a generous wine tasting of one white wine from each of the regions – Manorola was my favourite! Atop a hill I found an old nunnery with a graveyard – except there weren’t graves in the ground, rather long narrow tombs in the wall and family mausoleums. It was a peaceful place but also somewhat creepy!

Having cooled off with another swim, we hopped aboard a boat and cruised around the corner, enjoying the crystal sparkling waters beneath us and the warm wind on our faces. We sailed past the villages we had been in, and ended up in village number one – Manorola. Here we climbed up the steep streets and staircases to enjoy a magnificent view, and had time to poke our heads into little delicatessens and shops.

 

_MG_2936 _MG_2978After a final short train ride, we hopped aboard our bus, tired from a day of hiking, exploring, swimming, learning and sunshine and drove back to Florence.

 

One last adventure awaited us on our day of departure. We boarded our tiny, propeller plane to head back to Germany, buckled in and listened to the safety demonstration. The plane picked up speed on the runway, the engines revved and then…. they quietened, the plane slowed and turned around. Once again, it picked up speed, the engines roared and we were… not off. Soon the captain spoke to us informing us that there was a problem, and we would have to disembark. Florence airport is absolutely tiny, so the next 3 hours which we spent inside its single room were torture. With no announcements made, updates or even drink vouchers the plane full of passengers had no choice but to sit tight until finally, a bus came to collect us. We were taken to the same plane! I guess it had been fixed because this time it took off no problem, and thankfully delivered us safely in Stuttgart.

We will definitely be back for more relaxation, romance and red wine in Tuscany someday!

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